Kaiju for Dungeons and Dragons: Hurriking Spawn Player Race (AKA Kaijuborn)

Kaiju for Dungeons and Dragons: Hurriking Spawn Player Race (AKA Kaijuborn)

Creating kaiju for 5E is fun, but an original setting needs more than just monsters. A great way to flesh out an RPG world is to add original races to inhabit it. They can’t be whatever random concepts you come up with though, they need to fit cohesively into the universe you create. If it’s a world of kaiju, why not add races based on them too? Enter the Hurriking Spawn. As the name implies, the Spawn are derived from my previous creation Hurriking. Just as Hurriking took inspiration from…

Kaiju for Dungeons and Dragons: Mantisma, Matron of Life

Kaiju for Dungeons and Dragons: Mantisma, Matron of Life

I’m back this week with another kaiju for 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons! This week, I’m taking inspiration from Mothra to create a force for good in the monster-ravaged realm of Yamatai. Mantisma, Matron of Life Colossal fey (kaiju), neutral good “She is as beautiful as she is powerful. Thank the Gods she fights for us. Most of the time.” – Brother Tino’s Chronicle of Greater Kaiju Many kaiju are feared, but Mantisma is unique among them in that she is revered and loved by many. She acts as a guardian…

Kaiju for Dungeons and Dragons: Hurriking, the Monster Sovereign

Kaiju for Dungeons and Dragons: Hurriking, the Monster Sovereign

I’ve been running a fifth edition Dungeons & Dragons campaign for about seven or eight months now, and despite starting the game out of the Lost Mines of Phandelver book from the Starter Set, I left that behind months ago and have been writing the scenarios myself for the most part. Me being me, I decided to inject kaiju into the game. D&D’s only entity that really resembles a kaiju is the Tarrasque, but it’s ‘only’ sixty feet tall. Pathfinder has a dedicated creature subtype for kaiju, and Toho Kingdom has produced a plethora…

Hope Will Not Save You, Action Will

Hope Will Not Save You, Action Will

Hope, one of the most powerful and evocative words in the English language. It conjures images of holding on and persisting through adversity, clinging to the thought of a better tomorrow. It represents our greatest virtues as humans. We name children with this sentiment. We plaster it on political campaign posters. Jyn Erso says it about a hundred times in Rogue One. It’s the promise of a better tomorrow, whether we’re hoping something does happen, or if it doesn’t. Now what if I told you that all of this ‘hope’ was impeding…